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20110701
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. commander in afghanistan on the future of the war and the decision to begin pulling out. the man accused of the worst war crimes in europe since the natsys shows nothing but contempt for justice. mark phillips has the pictures from the court. and on this fourth of july as the space shuttle program nears an end, jim axelrod asks "what happened to the flags on the moon?" >> it's beautiful. >> pelley: do those star spangled banners yet wave? captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, chantix is the most popular anti-smoking drug on the market with annual sales of nearly $800 million. but a study out today raises new safety questions about it. chantix has already been linked to an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and now to a higher risk of heart disease we asked dr. jon lapook to tell us what we need to know about these new findings. >> reporter: today's study is worrisome news for the more than seven million americans who have taken chantix. a new analysis links the pill to a 72% increase in the risk of heart problems. johns ho
in afghanistan said today the focus of the war is about to shift away from taliban strongholds in the south and to the eastern border with pakistan where al qaeda still operates. general david petraeus is retiring from the army later this month and will become the new director of the c.i.a. mandy clark spoke with him today in kabul about the way forward in afghanistan. >> reporter: the last days of general david petraeus's command have been marked by two major events: the president's decision to begin withdrawing u.s. forces and days later an audacious attack on one of kabul's most important hotels. general petraeus told us the assault should not be seen as a setback. do you really think that the afghan security forces are ready if they can't protect a major hotel in the cap all? >> i can tell you that our special forces who were sporp not leading and not doing-- for the afghan forces who saw the crisis response unit said that they responded very courageously. in fact, that they took the loss of life with the wounded in action i think underscores that fact. >> reporter: but the training of
in 2002 in pakistan and held at a secret prison in afghanistan known as the salt pit. hosed down and left in an unheated cell overnight, rahman died of hypothermia. neither prisoner had been singled out for special interrogation. they both apparently died of simple misuse or neglect. >> pelley: david, what are you hearing about the c.i.a.'s reaction to this today? >> reporter: well, this happens to be c.i.a. director leon panetta's last day on the job before he takes over as secretary of defense. none of this happened on his watch, but he is clearly pleased by the decision. he issued a statement, saying "we are now finally about to close this chapter in our agency's history." >> pelley: thank you, david. leon panetta will be taking over tomorrow for robert gates. today, president obama surprised the outgoing defense secretary with a going-away present: the medal of freedom, the nation's highest civilian award. gates was appointed by president george w. bush four and a half years ago and stayed on to help president obama manage the wars in iraq and afghanistan. we have done a number of sto
would be targeted for supporting the u.s. war in afghanistan. then after a norwegian newspaper reprinted cartoons of the prophet mohammed in 2006, once again al qaeda called for revenge. then last july, three alleged al qaeda operatives were arrested inside norway for plotting to hit targets there. but i have to say, there have been no claims of responsibility. u.s. officials say right now there's no solid evidence this is al qaeda. there's a wide field of suspects, including political radicals. >> schieffer: okay. well, thank you very much, bob. bob orr in washington. well, yes, it is july, and it's supposed to be hot in july. but it's hard to remember it being this hot. today the east coast got a full dose of the heat wave that's blamed for 34 deaths nationwide. in new york and atlantic city, the temperature actually hit 104. baltimore and washington saw 105, and it felt a lot hotter. here's jim axelrod. >> reporter: in the last week, 1,472 temperature records have been set or tied across the country. newark, new jersey, hit 108 degrees-- the highest temperature ever recorded there. >>
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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